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Carex Hahijoenis Evergold

Carex Hahijoenis Evergold

GARDEN LOVE FOR NOVEMBER
By James The Gardener

November is a good time to give roses a trim, especially the taller varieties. Cutting them back by about a third will keep them stable during winter winds. Collect any fallen leaves from around them, which could harbour diseases such as black spot or rust.

Provided the ground is not frozen or water-logged, there is still time to plant bare-root, dormant roses and perennial roots, and finish planting spring flowering bulbs, such as tulips and narcissi.

Any frost tender plants should be given some protection now, especially those in containers. They can be moved into a frost-free greenhouse, or moved to a sheltered corner with the pots wrapped in bubble-wrap or layers of newspaper, to prevent the roots from freezing.

At this time of year evergreens come into their own, especially those that have bright foliage such as Euonymus Emerald and Gold and Emerald Gaiety, these useful small shrubs will blend well in your garden. Late flowering shrubs such as Caryopteris may still have a few lingering flowers if the autumn is mild. Passionflower can also flower well into winter.

Ornamental grasses have become popular in recent years, they bring structure to the garden throughout the year, and their appeal does not diminish during the autumn and winter. There are evergreen varieties such as Carex Evergold, which remains bright gold and green all year, and the contrasting Blue Festuca, which forms dense clumps of blue-green leaves. Miscanthus Sinensis flowers later and is tall and stately and can be breathtakingly beautiful on a cold frosty morning.

Euonymus Emerald 'n' Gold

Euonymus Emerald 'n' Gold

Cut back any dead or damaged stems from shrubs and collect fallen leaves so to prevent pests and diseases. Perennials stems can be cut to the ground now, but leave any that might have some structural appeal during the winter, or decorative seed heads to feed hungry birds. They can then be cut back in early spring when the new shoots begin to appear.

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